Denim fabrics

Denim fabric – the legendary jeans fabric in organic quality

It is well known that stories entwine around legends. The story of Denim is actually a real love story, because what would the jeans, our all-time favourite piece, be without Denim fabric?

'Denim' is actually called 'Serge' and, like so many good things, comes from French. There it describes a fabric made in twill weave - with an oblique burr, a blue warp thread and a white weft thread.

Because the Denim fabric was originally made in Nîmes, it was called Serge de Nîmes, a word that was to be shortened to Denim in the middle of the 19th century thanks to Levi Strauss, who emigrated to the US - the pronunciation of the first name was obviously a little too difficult for people overseas.

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With Lebenskleidung Denim fabric everything stays in place

When Levi Strauss emigrated to San Francisco in 1847, he was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time. During the California Gold Rush, thousands of gold-diggers were driven to San Francisco in search of sturdy trousers with pockets for their gold nuggets. Together with Jacob Davis, he patented those Denim fabric designs in 1873 that would later change the fashion world.

  • Initially, the trousers were made of brown canvas, which was soon replaced by the famous blue cotton fabric. What then happened was a never-ending triumph that continues to this day - because Denim fabric is en vogue like never before.
  • With organic Denim fabric from Lebenskleidung you are on the safe side in two respects. Fashionably, it enables you to sew everything from carrot pants to tube jeans to flared trousers or casual bags that comes to mind. At the same time it is made of 100% organic cotton and carries the GOTS seal (Global Organic Textile Standard), which ensures that your denim meets strict environmental and social standards from cotton field to finish.
  • Did you know that under GDR, jeans were a symbol of resistance and rebellion against the system? The background to this was that from the 1950s they were regarded as capitalist garment that had to be avoided as far as possible. Accordingly, jeans could not be bought officially. But where there is a ban, there is also protest. And so Denim fabric became a symbol of resistance.